Mr. Whitney by Felix Velez

As the image of Edward A. Whitney on this bench handing out books might suggest, Whitney was refreshingly indiscriminate in giving out this support, declaring it was to be “as freely offered to the hand worker as the brain worker.” Books were part of Edward A. Whitney¹s life. He read widely to acquire knowledge. He regularly solicited booksellers from around the country, even the world, for particular works. His elder brother and only surviving sibling ran a bookstore. Librarians and libraries fill his family heritage. In fact, there are no fewer than five Whitney libraries throughout the US and Canada. The first drafts of his will show he wanted to fund a community library, but Andrew Carnegie upstaged him by building one of his libraries in Sheridan in 1905.   On a larger level, Whitney focused on education to the exclusion of all other interests. In his will, he declared “it seemed well to my mind to devote the net income of the property that I leave towards aiding in the needy and deserving young men and young women in attaining, through education, such positions in life as may appeal to them as best suited to their individual needs and capacities.” Felix Velez is an internationally known sculptor.

Cool Waters by D. Michael Thomas

Edward A. Whitney moved to the northern Rocky Mountains around 1880. A man of considerable business acumen, he sensed opportunity in livestock and took part in the great cattle boom of the early 1880s. He began in Miles City, but within a few years migrated south to Sheridan. By 1885, he had established a bank and continued to invest in local ranches and livestock. Whitney survived the 1886-87 cattle bust and continued to slowly acquire more land in Sheridan and Johnson County. This persistence differentiated Whitney from many peers. Other educated easterners, which Whitney was, pulled up stakes when they saw their cattle fortunes fail. Whitney stayed and rebuilt. For the rest of his life, cattle and land held his attention. Records show he had interests in at least a dozen local ranches. He often partnered with Sheridan¹s other prominent ranching families like the Kendricks, Wallops, and Moncreiffes.    Whitney also intuitively sensed the importance of water. Records show a keen interest in water rights and irrigation ditches. Water played a key role when Whitney set up his educational trust. In early drafts of his will, he directed that trustees not come from certain township or sections, but rather from specific watersheds in Sheridan County. His descriptions show an intimate knowledge of creeks and streams.   Lastly, Whitney, a serious and focused man, seemed to appreciate in others what he himself struggled to do: pause and enjoy the day. He understood that relaxation was just as important as work, although he would rather work. D. Michael Thomas, a Wyoming native, has been sculpting for over 30 years.

Team Ropin’ by Mike Flanagan

Balancing Boys by Dan Hill

A new sculpture has been displayed to enhance the beauty of the park and honor Mr. Whitney’s memory. In collaboration with the Sheridan Public Arts Committee, Whitney Benefits has displayed the sculpture “Balancing Boys” by Utah artist Dan Hill. This three- piece sculpture can be viewed on the west side of the park abutting the sidewalk on North Jefferson Street. Return to Whitney Commons
Whitney Benefits and ACT have partnered to provide free Wi-Fi throughout Whitney Commons.
Whitney Benefits
An Educational Foundation by the late Mr. Edward A. Whitney

Whitney Commons Sculptures

© Whitney Benefits, Inc.  All Rights Reserved Phone: 307-674-7303

Mr. Whitney by Felix Velez

As the image of Edward A. Whitney on this bench handing out books might suggest, Whitney was refreshingly indiscriminate in giving out this support, declaring it was to be “as freely offered to the hand worker as the brain worker.” Books were part of Edward A. Whitney¹s life. He read widely to acquire knowledge. He regularly solicited booksellers from around the country, even the world, for particular works. His elder brother and only surviving sibling ran a bookstore. Librarians and libraries fill his family heritage. In fact, there are no fewer than five Whitney libraries throughout the US and Canada. The first drafts of his will show he wanted to fund a community library, but Andrew Carnegie upstaged him by building one of his libraries in Sheridan in 1905.   On a larger level, Whitney focused on education to the exclusion of all other interests. In his will, he declared “it seemed well to my mind to devote the net income of the property that I leave towards aiding in the needy and deserving young men and young women in attaining, through education, such positions in life as may appeal to them as best suited to their individual needs and capacities.” Felix Velez is an internationally known sculptor.

Cool Waters by D. Michael Thomas

Edward A. Whitney moved to the northern Rocky Mountains around 1880. A man of considerable business acumen, he sensed opportunity in livestock and took part in the great cattle boom of the early 1880s. He began in Miles City, but within a few years migrated south to Sheridan. By 1885, he had established a bank and continued to invest in local ranches and livestock. Whitney survived the 1886-87 cattle bust and continued to slowly acquire more land in Sheridan and Johnson County. This persistence differentiated Whitney from many peers. Other educated easterners, which Whitney was, pulled up stakes when they saw their cattle fortunes fail. Whitney stayed and rebuilt. For the rest of his life, cattle and land held his attention. Records show he had interests in at least a dozen local ranches. He often partnered with Sheridan¹s other prominent ranching families like the Kendricks, Wallops, and Moncreiffes.    Whitney also intuitively sensed the importance of water. Records show a keen interest in water rights and irrigation ditches. Water played a key role when Whitney set up his educational trust. In early drafts of his will, he directed that trustees not come from certain township or sections, but rather from specific watersheds in Sheridan County. His descriptions show an intimate knowledge of creeks and streams.   Lastly, Whitney, a serious and focused man, seemed to appreciate in others what he himself struggled to do: pause and enjoy the day. He understood that relaxation was just as important as work, although he would rather work. D. Michael Thomas, a Wyoming native, has been sculpting for over 30 years.

Team Ropin’ by Mike Flanagan

Balancing Boys by Dan Hill

A new sculpture has been displayed to enhance the beauty of the park and honor Mr. Whitney’s memory. In collaboration with the Sheridan Public Arts Committee, Whitney Benefits has displayed the sculpture “Balancing Boys” by Utah artist Dan Hill. This three-piece sculpture can be viewed on the west side of the park abutting the sidewalk on North Jefferson Street. Return to Whitney Commons
Whitney Benefits and ACT have partnered to provide free Wi-Fi throughout Whitney Commons.

Whitney Commons Sculptures

Whitney Benefits
An Educational Foundation by the late Mr. Edward A. Whitney
© Whitney Benefits, Inc.  All Rights Reserved Phone: 307-674-7303

Mr. Whitney by Felix Velez

As the image of Edward A. Whitney on this bench handing out books might suggest, Whitney was refreshingly indiscriminate in giving out this support, declaring it was to be “as freely offered to the hand worker as the brain worker.” Books were part of Edward A. Whitney¹s life. He read widely to acquire knowledge. He regularly solicited booksellers from around the country, even the world, for particular works. His elder brother and only surviving sibling ran a bookstore. Librarians and libraries fill his family heritage. In fact, there are no fewer than five Whitney libraries throughout the US and Canada. The first drafts of his will show he wanted to fund a community library, but Andrew Carnegie upstaged him by building one of his libraries in Sheridan in 1905.   On a larger level, Whitney focused on education to the exclusion of all other interests. In his will, he declared “it seemed well to my mind to devote the net income of the property that I leave towards aiding in the needy and deserving young men and young women in attaining, through education, such positions in life as may appeal to them as best suited to their individual needs and capacities.” Felix Velez is an internationally known sculptor.

Cool Waters by D. Michael Thomas

Edward A. Whitney moved to the northern Rocky Mountains around 1880. A man of considerable business acumen, he sensed opportunity in livestock and took part in the great cattle boom of the early 1880s. He began in Miles City, but within a few years migrated south to Sheridan. By 1885, he had established a bank and continued to invest in local ranches and livestock. Whitney survived the 1886-87 cattle bust and continued to slowly acquire more land in Sheridan and Johnson County. This persistence differentiated Whitney from many peers. Other educated easterners, which Whitney was, pulled up stakes when they saw their cattle fortunes fail. Whitney stayed and rebuilt. For the rest of his life, cattle and land held his attention. Records show he had interests in at least a dozen local ranches. He often partnered with Sheridan¹s other prominent ranching families like the Kendricks, Wallops, and Moncreiffes.    Whitney also intuitively sensed the importance of water. Records show a keen interest in water rights and irrigation ditches. Water played a key role when Whitney set up his educational trust. In early drafts of his will, he directed that trustees not come from certain township or sections, but rather from specific watersheds in Sheridan County. His descriptions show an intimate knowledge of creeks and streams.   Lastly, Whitney, a serious and focused man, seemed to appreciate in others what he himself struggled to do: pause and enjoy the day. He understood that relaxation was just as important as work, although he would rather work. D. Michael Thomas, a Wyoming native, has been sculpting for over 30 years.

Team Ropin’ by Mike Flanagan

Balancing Boys by Dan Hill

A new sculpture has been displayed to enhance the beauty of the park and honor Mr. Whitney’s memory. In collaboration with the Sheridan Public Arts Committee, Whitney Benefits has displayed the sculpture “Balancing Boys” by Utah artist Dan Hill. This three-piece sculpture can be viewed on the west side of the park abutting the sidewalk on North Jefferson Street. Return to Whitney Commons
Whitney Benefits

Whitney Commons Sculptures

© Whitney Benefits, Inc.  All Rights Reserved Phone: 307-674-7303

Mr. Whitney by Felix Velez

As the image of Edward A. Whitney on this bench handing out books might suggest, Whitney was refreshingly indiscriminate in giving out this support, declaring it was to be “as freely offered to the hand worker as the brain worker.” Books were part of Edward A. Whitney¹s life. He read widely to acquire knowledge. He regularly solicited booksellers from around the country, even the world, for particular works. His elder brother and only surviving sibling ran a bookstore. Librarians and libraries fill his family heritage. In fact, there are no fewer than five Whitney libraries throughout the US and Canada. The first drafts of his will show he wanted to fund a community library, but Andrew Carnegie upstaged him by building one of his libraries in Sheridan in 1905.   On a larger level, Whitney focused on education to the exclusion of all other interests. In his will, he declared “it seemed well to my mind to devote the net income of the property that I leave towards aiding in the needy and deserving young men and young women in attaining, through education, such positions in life as may appeal to them as best suited to their individual needs and capacities.” Felix Velez is an internationally known sculptor.

Cool Waters by D. Michael Thomas

Edward A. Whitney moved to the northern Rocky Mountains around 1880. A man of considerable business acumen, he sensed opportunity in livestock and took part in the great cattle boom of the early 1880s. He began in Miles City, but within a few years migrated south to Sheridan. By 1885, he had established a bank and continued to invest in local ranches and livestock. Whitney survived the 1886-87 cattle bust and continued to slowly acquire more land in Sheridan and Johnson County. This persistence differentiated Whitney from many peers. Other educated easterners, which Whitney was, pulled up stakes when they saw their cattle fortunes fail. Whitney stayed and rebuilt. For the rest of his life, cattle and land held his attention. Records show he had interests in at least a dozen local ranches. He often partnered with Sheridan¹s other prominent ranching families like the Kendricks, Wallops, and Moncreiffes.    Whitney also intuitively sensed the importance of water. Records show a keen interest in water rights and irrigation ditches. Water played a key role when Whitney set up his educational trust. In early drafts of his will, he directed that trustees not come from certain township or sections, but rather from specific watersheds in Sheridan County. His descriptions show an intimate knowledge of creeks and streams.   Lastly, Whitney, a serious and focused man, seemed to appreciate in others what he himself struggled to do: pause and enjoy the day. He understood that relaxation was just as important as work, although he would rather work. D. Michael Thomas, a Wyoming native, has been sculpting for over 30 years.

Team Ropin’ by Mike Flanagan

Balancing Boys by Dan Hill

A new sculpture has been displayed to enhance the beauty of the park and honor Mr. Whitney’s memory. In collaboration with the Sheridan Public Arts Committee, Whitney Benefits has displayed the sculpture “Balancing Boys” by Utah artist Dan Hill. This three-piece sculpture can be viewed on the west side of the park abutting the sidewalk on North Jefferson Street. Return to Whitney Commons

Whitney Commons

Sculptures

Whitney Benefits
© Whitney Benefits, Inc. All Rights Reserved Phone: 307-674-7303